Global Innovation in Space and Beyond

Global Innovation in Space and Beyond

September 12, 2018

From missions that stretch billions of miles across our solar system to protection from ballistic threats, the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab deals with some of the most complex engineering challenges imaginable. Learn how their approach to innovation might apply to your business challenges.

Ralph Semmel, Laboratory Director, will kick off the session with an overview of the Lab’s strategy for innovation, which covers 6,300 staff members who work across projects ranging from cybersecurity to planetary defense.

Dr. Turtle will cover an exciting new mission concept called Dragonfly, a rotorcraft-lander that would explore Saturn’s large, exotic moon Titan. Should NASA select this daring mission for flight, Dragonfly would shed unprecedented light on a fascinating, Earth-like world of clouds, lakes and seas of liquid ethane and methane, and vast expanses of organic sand dunes.

Dr. Chabot will tell us about a very important project that could one day save the world. This mission is called DART, which is short for Double Asteroid Redirect Test. Set for launch in 2021, DART will test what’s known as the kinetic impactor technique — striking an asteroid to shift its orbit — and take a critical step in demonstrating we can protect our planet from a potential impact.

Speakers

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Zibi Turtle

Research Scientist
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

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Nancy Chabot

Planetary Scientist
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

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Dr. Ralph Semmel

Director
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory